Roger_Ebert-movie_criticRoger Ebert, one of the greatest movie critics of all time, passed away from cancer at age 70 a few weeks ago. He updated his blog one last time last year with his list of his greatest movies of all time. If you are a movie fan, you should try to see these films once in your lifetime. Keep in mind, this is one man’s opinion, and also the fact that he had to consider thousands of the best movies of all time (not just this current generation). Think of how difficult a task this would be? So let’s take a look, for you movie lovers (displayed in no particular order):

  • AguirreAguirre: The Wrath of God (1972): One of Oscar-nominated director Werner Herzog’s best films of his career, this is worth watching for its beautiful cinematography, but requires you to pay attention to its story due to the disquieting slow pacing. The film is about Spanish soldiers in the 16th century on an doomed expedition searching for the fabled El Dorado treasure, whose leader spirals into madness. Reason to watch: Kinski’s portrayal of angry Aguirre (click HERE to watch trailer).
  • Apocalypse-Now_napalmApocalypse Now (1979): Nominated for eight Oscar Awards, director Francis Ford Coppola’s movie is about a secret mission during the Vietnam war to assassinate a  rogue colonel who has gone insane. The casual movie fan will have difficulty understanding the film’s deep meaning: how war can affect the human psyche in horrible ways. Reason to watch: The napalm explosion shot, and the outrageous line: “You smell that? I love the smell of napalm in the morning” (click HERE to watch 8 clips from the movie – approx 30 mins total).
  • Citizen-Kane_wellesCitizen Kane (1941): Director Orson Welles got nine Oscar nominations for this movie about the media circus that follows  the death of a millionaire newspaper tycoon. The pacing of the storytelling is very different from today’s movies, yet by watching the end of this film, you will appreciate why Citizen Kane has been called one of the greatest of all time. Reason to watch: American Film Institute polled 1,500 filmmakers, critics, and historians, who ranked this as #1 on the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (click HERE to watch entire movie).
  • La-dolce-vitaLa Dolce Vita (1960): Frederico Fellini nominated for Best Director in this Italian film about the high class elite in Rome in the 1950s. The production values and cinematography is at its best in this scathing satire of “the sweet life”, and the writing also nominated for an Oscar. Reason to watch: The famous fountain scene with the lead character Sylvia, who is a former Miss Sweden in real life (watch director Martin Scorcese’s commentary about Fellini and La Dolce Vita HERE).
  • Generel-KeatonThe General (1926): If you haven’t seen a silent movie in your life, then this might be the one to see. Buster Keaton’s epic film, which has been voted as one of “The 50 Greatest Comedies Of All Time”, is also full of thrilling action. The story is about spies stealing a train during the US Civil War. Reason to watch: After watching this epic, be amazed and wonder how this could have bombed in the box office? (click HERE to watch entire movie)
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARaging Bull (1980): Of course, you know of Martin Scorsese’s award-winning Hugo, and The Departed, but have you seen Raging Bull? Robert DeNiro won an Oscar for Best Actor, and it has been praised as one of the best performances of all time. Based on the real-life boxer Jake LaMotta, we see the rise and humongous fall to ruin that he takes all due to his uncontrollable anger. Be ready for a very violent film and plenty of foul language, this film is not for the faint of heart. Reason to watch: The beautiful black & white cinematography (click HERE to watch entire movie)
  • 2001-space-odyssey2001: A Space Odyssey (1968): Nominated for four Oscars, Stanley Kubrick’s epic masterpiece will boggle and blow your mind. This is not your normal movie, one of those “loved it” or “hated it” movies – it wants to confuse you and will make you think, “What the heck just happened?” The story is about two crewman on a manned flight to Jupiter, the theme being man versus machine. Reason to watch: Interesting fact – there are a total of 88 dialogue-free minutes in the movie (click HERE to watch entire movie).
  • Tokyo-StoryTokyo Story (1953): Yasujiro Ozu’s movie makes you instantly sympathize with the older generation, who have traditional values, while the younger generation is shown as selfish, and too busy to spend time with their parents – an example of the old “cat’s in the cradle“. This powerfully emotional movie is a definite must-see. Reason to watch: The realism – and be ready to weep a little (click HERE to watch entire movie).
  • Tree-of-LifeThe Tree of Life (2011): Director Terrence Malick was nominated for three Oscars for this film about the origin and meaning of life. Another “loved it” or “hated it” movie, this one is not for the casual movie fan looking for a typical ‘Hollywood’ movie, no real storyline at all – but it will make you think about your life and your loved ones. Reason to watch: the visual imagery and cinematography (click HERE for trailer)
  • Vertigo-jimmy-stewartVertigo (1958): Legendary Alfred Hitchcock should be on this list, but why this film? Why not Psycho, Birds, or North by Northwest? Perhaps it’s because it’s been called the most personal, emotional, and complex of them all. This psychological detective mystery is one of those movies that makes you want to watch several times. Reason to watch: See the million dollar makeover that Universal Studios put on the digitally remastered version (click HERE to watch a total of 30 mins of clips).

“Every great film should seem new every time you see it.” – Roger Ebert

http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2012/04/the_greatest_films_of_all_time.html

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